Breaking Up With My Phone: Part III

Many of us feel a lack of self-control around technology and have strong desires to develop healthier relationships with our devices. Luckily, there are dozens of authors, commentators, and individuals who are helping us envision radical new ways of living lives independent of technology, and intentionally with technology.

A car parked along a river in Yellowstone National Park indicating a road trip.

But What About Right Now

After hearing about a peer’s commitment to the present moment, I have realized that I too default to sharing about experiences with a clear distinction of “then” versus “now.” I am taking her words as an invitation to practice honesty and truth-telling in the present instead of waiting three months to write you a post about insights on my current experience.

A hand chained to a smartphone

Breaking Up With My iPhone

Is it possible, in the age of smartphones, to have healthy relationships with technology? How has excessive phone use affected our mental health?

a colorful poster which reads We Love L'Arche

Crip Time, Care Time, & L’Arche Time

I recently read Sarah E. Stevens’ essay “Care Time” in Disability Studies Quarterly, in which she reflects on how her experiences as a care partner affect her relationship to time. Stevens’ essay got me thinking about the two years I spent as a live-in assistant at L’Arche Heartland. Stevens’ description of care time strongly resonated with my experiences as a L’Arche assistant, but I also noticed some interesting points of divergence between care time and “L’Arche time.”

the Twitter log in page

My Year without Twitter

I left Twitter in February 2018. I had been contemplating a clean break for a while, knowing how much time I spent on that website that I wish was spent elsewhere, and the effect that it was having on the way I thought about the world. Here’s what I learned.

a phone with the screen set to grayscale

I Grayscaled My Phone

It turns out that grayscaling your screen doesn’t just make your phone boring and less interesting to look at. It also makes your phone’s user interface more confusing and harder to parse with a single glance. Which, thereby, makes me less inclined to spend time on my phone and more inclined to throw my phone across the room and go read or go outside.

A storage unit with packed boxes

Ruminations on the Simplicity of Simple Living

I’d like to offer the consideration of simple living as something more than a practice of less. I feel as though my JV house, at least, was remiss in giving simple living it’s due, as a tenet; I believe it has a much wider conceptual scope and a much greater nuance of potential practices than I ever realized.